The Lane Types and Uses

The current DSRC J2735 defines eight lane types, each created using the generic lane type.  Not all of these are “lanes” in the common sense of that word, but all of them are represented by the same XY delta offset process of Node Points to describe their geospatial extent in terms of closed polygons.  There are a number of very important and normative details about the assumptions for each lane type that the standard explains in length (see Section 11).

Here we simply summarize the types. The links below go to a page dedicated to further key details from the standard (with commentary) and then link to further practical usage hints for that type.

The 8 Lane Types

Motor Vehicle Lanes
Motor vehicle traffic is presumed to occupy and follow a motor vehicle lane along the described lane path (in the allowed directions of travel) and can be present at ANY time (except that vehicles may not come to rest at those segments which are marked as “do not block”).

Pedestrian Crosswalk Lanes
Crosswalk traffic is presumed to occupy and use a crosswalk lane along the described lane path (in the allowed directions of travel) and to enter the crosswalk and be present ONLY when there is an active movement for the lane (except that pedestrians or any other allowed users may safely come to rest at those intermediate segments which are marked as safe islands or refuge points along the path).

Sidewalk Lanes
Pedestrian traffic (and bicycle traffic if indicated as allowed) is presumed to occupy and follow a sidewalk lane along the described lane path (in the allowed directions of travel) and can be present at ANY time and flow at any rate (i.e., long stationary periods are expected).

Bicycle Lanes
Bicycle traffic is presumed to occupy and follow a bicycle lane along the described lane path (in the allowed directions of travel) and can in general be present at ANY time.

Median Lanes
In general, no type of traffic is presumed to occupy and follow a median lane along the described lane path.

Striping Lanes
No type of traffic is presumed to occupy and follow a striping lane along its path; rather, this type of lane is used to provide a visual indication of the edge of the travel path between lanes across unusually long intersections, so the actual vehicle traffic path typically occurs alongside of it.

Tracked Vehicle Lanes
Tracked vehicle traffic (rail, trolley, and tram type vehicles) is presumed to occupy and follow a tracked vehicle lane along the described lane path center line (in the allowed directions of travel) and can be present at ANY time (and such vehicles may come to rest along the path, and this may effectively block other traffic flow).

Parking Lanes
Stationary and slow moving vehicle traffic is presumed to occupy the parking lane type along the described lane path (in the allowed directions of travel) and can be present at ANY time.

The rather long sentence which follows each entry in the above is taken verbatim from the current standard.  The remaining text of the clause provided for each lane type contains additional user information.  Much of it is normative.  In the above links to more detailed articles, some additional author commentary is provided regarding the design intent of these statements.

Note that a sidewalk and a crosswalk are two distinct lanes, each with normative presumed user behavior in the above.

 

Common Properties

In the above sentences two key concepts are expressed for every lane type.

  • If the lane’s intended user can come to rest and safety stop within the lane itself (or if they mus keep moving and exit it)
  • If there is a gating function (typically a signal light head) are the end of the lane that impedes passage past the stop line

These two concepts can be expressed into the following two helpful tables:

Presence Allowed in Lane Table,
to be provided

 

Rules for Passing the Stop Line,
to be provided

 

 

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